Also conveniently known as dog daisy, oxeye daisy for dogs is an incredibly useful plant found by roadsides and around vacant lots in North America. This wild relative of the pyrethrum daisy is similar in appearance to the standard daisy, although there are differences in how the leaf appears. The leaves of oxeye daisy feature long stems that have rounded teeth around the round edges.

Considered an invasive species in more than 40 countries around the world, oxeye daisy is native to Eurasia but is now found all over the place in North America. Its plants bloom first in the early summer months, then remain in bloom until the autumn. The leaves and flowers are the most useful for herbalists, with teas, tinctures and dried powdered herbs the most common applications.

For dogs, dog daisy has properties as an insecticide and an antihistamine. This makes it particularly useful for fighting fleas. Oxeye daisy is also noted for diuretic properties and can aid in the cessation of bleeding, with particular affinities toward the respiratory system and the skin.

Therapeutic Purposes and Health Benefits of Oxeye: 

Oxeye daisy has a number of useful applications for dogs and is noted for its flower tea, which carries effects in combating anything from allergies to seasonal hay fever. This, along with its impact with respect to taking on common pests, makes oxeye daisy one of the most versatile and useful of all “weeds” in North America.

  • Brewing the leaf tea: is a great way to produce a response to the body’s allergic reactions, as the antihistamine properties of oxeye daisy for dogs are noted for slowing the body and reducing tricky things like mucus production and watery eyes. The leaf tea is also good for reducing sneezing and those itchy, wet discharges that can create so much trouble for your four-legged friend. Try combining dog daisy with a little bit of nettle.
  • Organic Pesticide: Oxeye daisy is noted for containing pyrethrins, which are naturally occurring pesticides found in certain flowers. This organic pesticide is particularly useful for fighting fleas. To use oxeye daisy for your dog’s flea problem, simply create a skin rinse from chopped flowers. Another way to do this is to utilize the dried leaves as an all-natural flea powder. Simply apply directly to the affected area.
  • Oxeye daisy’s diuretic properties:  make it an asset for increasing urinary flow in your dog. This can also dilute overconcentrated urine, which can help control foul-smelling output and alleviate acid control problems. Dog daisy is particularly effective at providing a mild but impactful astringent and antimicrobial dosage to swollen urinary membranes.
  • Herbal Remedy: As a remedy for minor cuts and abrasions, oxeye daisy is very useful. By using a fresh leaf poultice of the readily available “weed,” this herbal remedy can stop bleeding and provide healing where needed. Oxeye daisy for dogs can also be combined with other antimicrobial herbs, like yarrow or bee balm, to create a ready-to-use field dressing.

Preventative Measures of Oxeye Daisy

Some animals may be allergic to oxeye daisy, so it’s best to test the product first before using it. If there is any redness in the affected area, discontinue use immediately and proceed with one of the other alternatives for wound dressing and care. Test the tea on your pet’s skin as well, as this should produce a noticeable reaction if there are any allergies to worry about.

As with any herbal treatment, it’s always best to exercise caution. In the case of oxeye daisy, however, this product is mostly safe apart from those demonstrable allergic reactions. It is a mild herbal treatment in a lot of ways and it does seem to gather more momentum when it is combined with other herbs, so be aware of any further allergies if you use alternative medicines.

Reasons to Use

The best reason to use oxeye daisy for dogs is that it’s so readily available. As a “weed” found all over the place in North America, you should be able to find a wealth of this herbal option by the roadsides and in lots around your neighborhood. It is tolerant of droughts and survives almost anything, too, so like most “weeds” it is a sturdy plant with multiple benefits for your pet.

References: Herbs for Pets by M.L. Wulff-Tilford and G.L. Tilford, Natural Remedies for Dogs and Cats by CJ Puotinen

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