This is the third article of the series on treating dogs with liver disease.  In this article you’ll find two recipes for dogs fighting liver disease.

These recipes ARE NOT public domain and are not meant to be shared over the internet without our written consent.

Both were developed by a nutritionist specifically for our girl “Lulu” when she was diagnosed with the disease.

Most often traditional veterinarians will want to place dogs on a prescription diet such as Hills LD.  A home made diet is in my opinion, and most nutritionists opinion, a much better, healthier option. By the way, Lulu wouldn’t touch it.

READ THIS FIRST

These recipes were paid for by me and I’m sharing them as a courtesy to other dog owners who might be able to use them. Copyright restrictions apply and you must ask me before posting this anywhere on the internet or offline.

When I started Lulu on these recipes, her liver enzyme levels weren’t extreme so this diet was o.k. but you have to be very careful.  This means that having your dog’s blood work done routinely (every 6 months); including a complete liver profile is critical.  If the liver enzymes remain stable, then you can continue with the diet; but, you have no way of knowing this information unless you have the blood work done on a regular basis.

Neither recipe should be given to a dog who is storing copper.  It’s critical that you ask your dog’s vet if you’re uncertain.

Can Raw Be the Answer?

Many believe that feeding a species appropriate raw diet can help dogs with liver disease. While this is the complete opposite of what you’ll find here, I don’t believe that it’s not possible.  I’m a huge fan of a raw diet and I recommend them all the time, however, this page is dedicated to what I actually did for Lulu when she was diagnosed with Liver Disease.

DON’T IGNORE THE ABOVE STEP – PLEASE!

The following recipes for liver disease in dogs are for a weeks worth of food and based upon Lulu’s weight which was approximately 70-75 pounds at the time they were developed.

Also, you’ll notice that there are no veggies included in the recipe and this is because Lulu had IBS and veggies can often cause soft stool and diarrhea. You can always add your veggies to the recipe.

THE RECIPES ARE THE PROPERTY OF YOUROLDDOG.com AND ARE MEANT AS A COURTESY TO OUR VISITORS. THE RECIPES ARE NOT PUBLIC DOMAIN AND ARE NOT TO BE COPIED or PASTED ON ANYONE’S WEBSITE OR SHARED IN EBOOK’S, etc. WITHOUT THE WRITTEN CONSENT OF YOUROLDDOG.com

dog liver disease recipes tested approved

If you prefer less complicated recipes, please see our 5 ingredient recipecookbook here.

**Please be sure to read both of of our articles on Dandelion Root and Burdock Root which are very powerful tools for your dog’s liver problems.

Including desiccated liver in with the diet can also be a very a good idea as a glandular therapy for dogs with liver disease and elevated liver enzymes.  Learn more here.

Recipe #1If your dog has elevated liver enzymes which could be due to ammonia in the blood (Hepatic Encephalopathy), or he or she is vomiting bile, this recipe is fine. Do NOT feed this recipe if your dog has copper storage disease.  If you’re not sure, ask your dog’s vet.

Fish & Ground Beef

8 Cups of well cooked brown rice (1560 grams)
7 Cups peeled, cooked and mashed sweet potato (1000 grams)
3 Cups cooked and chopped chicken livers (420 grams)
7 large hard boiled eggs chopped
2 Cups poached, flaked, boneless haddock, cod or other whitefish (not tuna, shark or mackerel)
18 ounces regular ground beef, cooked in a little water but not overly browned

  • Mix together and allow to cool completely. Stir in 1 tablespoon of fish oil.
  • Next, YOU MUST and I repeat MUST add the following supplements in order to balance the diet:
  • Calcium: Now Calcium Carbonate was the product recommended to me and what I used for Lulu. *It should be noted that Lulu was given 1 cup of cottage cheese daily so this effected the amount of calcium carbonate needed.
  • Iodine: Add 6 kelp tablets (take apart and sprinkle over the mixture).
  • Zinc 50mg: Finely crushed and and sprinkle THREE (3) through-out the food.
  • Manganese 10mg Caps: Add TWO (2) finely crushed caps.
  • Copper 2mg : Sprinkle SEVEN (7) of the capsule through-out the food.
  • Coconut Oil: THIS SHOULD BE ADDED DAILY and NOT ALL ONCE -Add 1/2 teaspoon daily to your dog’s food.

Using your hands, mix the food real good so that the supplements are mixed evenly through the food. Divide the food into 7 even batches and place in a freezer bag and freeze. Pull a bag out of the freezer the day before. Divide the bag into two meals for your dog that day.

Each morning 1 can of low sodium sockeye salmon (1476 grams) was added to Lulu’s breakfast and at dinner she received 1 cup of low fat cottage cheese with her meal.

Recipes #2 If your dog has elevated liver enzymes  which could be due to ammonia in the (Hepatic Encephalopathy), or vomiting bile, then this recipe is fine. Do NOT feed this recipe if your dog has copper storage disease.  If you’re not sure, ask your dog’s vet.

Chicken and Salmon
7 Cups well cooked brown rice cooked very well (1365 grams)
2 Cups (measure out 2 cups of raw Quinoa) then cook (340 grams)
3 Cups peeled, cooked and mashed sweet potato (600 grams)
9 Cups lightly cooked ground chicken with fat (990 grams)
3 Ounces poached liver finely chopped
2 – 6 oz cans low sodium sockeye salmon (170grams per can)

  • Allow this mixture to cool and stir in one tablespoon of fish oil. Add all of the following supplements.
  • Calcium: Eight and one half (8.5) LEVEL teaspoons and sprinkle evenly over food. *Again, it should be noted that Lulu was given 1 cup of cottage cheese daily effecting the amount needed in the recipe.
  • Iodine: Sprinkle SIX (6) capsules evenly over the food.
  • Zinc 50mg: Finely crush and sprinkle FOUR (4) evenly over food.
  • Manganese 10mg: Finely crush and add ONE (1) evenly to food.
  • NO COPPER NEEDED
  • Coconut Oil: THIS SHOULD BE ADDED DAILY and NOT ALL AT ONCE -Add 1 teaspoon daily to your dog’s food.

Using your hands, mix the food real good so that the supplements are mixed evenly through the food. Divide the food into 7 even daily portions and place in individual freezer bags. Freeze and pull out what you need the day before. The bag is for two daily meals.

*Note: Each morning 1 can of low sodium sockeye salmon (1476 grams) was also added to Lulu’s breakfast and at dinner she received 1 cup of low fat cottage cheese with as well.

Copyright June. 2012, Janie Knetzer

Did you find these Recipes For Dogs With Liver Disease helpful?

 

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Showing 74 comments
  • Liz
    Reply

    How do you know if your dog has a copper issue. My vet just told me about elevated ALT levels. Never mentioned copper.

    • janie
      Reply

      Hi Liz:

      Call your dog’s vet and ask if your dog is storing copper or not.

      Janie

  • Arthur Fry
    Reply

    Hi Janie;

    I would like to use this recipe for my 8 yr old Sheltie, who has a gallbladder thinkening, sludgey bile and HE. As he weighs 30 lbs. and this recipe is for your 70 lb dog, can I simply take 43% of the amounts here and still come out accurate?

    Any guidance you can provide would be most appreciated.

    Thanks,

    Arthur.

    • janie
      Reply

      Hi Arthur:

      I apologize for not getting back to you sooner. Using 43% should be perfectly fine for your 30 lb Sheltie.

      Janie

  • Arthur
    Reply

    That’s great. Thanks for getting back to me.

  • Arthur
    Reply

    Hi Janie,

    Sorry, just one more question. For the tinned salmon you used it says 1476 grams. That seems like very big cans of salmon. I bought Raincoast brand sockeye salmon, but each tin is only 130 grams. What brand did you use and what size cans were they to total up to 1476 grams?

    Again, thanks for all your help, I really appreciate it.

    Arthur

    • janie
      Reply

      Hi Arthur:

      I meant to get back to you earlier, but I just didn’t get a chance.

      That was actually a mistake and I corrected it in the article. Thank you for bringing it to my attention.

      I used Wild Planet Wild Alaska Sockeye Salmon, but it’s expensive at $6.00 per 6 oz can (170 grams). You can also use fresh salmon (cooked) if you have access to fresh Arthur.

      My pleasure and I hope this helps you.

      Janie

  • Arthur
    Reply

    Excellent. Thank-you for clarifying that for me.

    • janie
      Reply

      My pleasure Arthur!

      Janie

  • Diana
    Reply

    Thank you so much for sharing your knowledge. Our little Abby was just diagnosed and I want to give her the best options for a good diet. You are a blessing!

    • janie
      Reply

      Hi Diana:

      I’m sorry to hear about Abby (I have an Abby too). So glad that I could help! I hope your girl does well.

      Janie

  • ashleigh Davies
    Reply

    Hi there,
    I’m so hoping you can help. We live in South Africa and our little Maltese cross recently had a liver infection and has a mass in her liver. She has been to the vet which resulted in about ten different meds needing to be taken. They advised to put her on hills LD – which she turns nose up at.
    Would your diet work for her? She has been vomiting up bile for a while – but I guess at 16 she’s probably done great to get so far! ????????

    I look forward to any advice you have regarding quantities and diet.

    • janie
      Reply

      Hi Ashleigh:

      I personally would never feed that food from Hills. Do you know if she’s storing copper Ashleigh?

      Janie

  • Jennifer Raquet-Agosto
    Reply

    Hello,I have a Scotty with copper storage disease as well as high levels,do u have any suggestions on a homemade diet,we r struggling, Lucy will not eat the prescription food and we r trying home made but aren’t sure of the proper things to use. Beef and chicken are our go to.any advice would be appriciated.Thanks . Jenn.

    • janie
      Reply

      Hi Jenn:

      I’m sorry to hear about Lucy’s liver problems. I wouldn’t feed the prescription diet. I would definitely make it home made. Are you giving any supplements and what are you feeding in addition to beef or chicken?

      Janie

      • Jennifer Raquet-Agosto
        Reply

        Right now we r on a lot of perscriptions,the vet has just mentioned a supplement since I was thinking toward making her food.Truthfully I was just starting this,this month.so we just boiled chicken and potatoe.cut it up and she ate it for a couple days,she is coming from a life of Blue buffalo canned grain free food.I would give her a different flavor each day,quarter of a can. She seemed to not get bored that way.Now this is a whole new world,she was on script diet,canned diet and after 2 cases she won’t look at it,I did use a pumpkin, cottage cheeses,chicken,oatmeal recipe I found ,she seems to.like it but that won’t last so I need to find a variety.I just started looking on line yesterday and your site came up,so U are were I started.Lucy does have a big background,On the liver end when she got a biopsy done her liver isn’t like anything our vet ever saw. She describes it as bumpy all over.She has had numerous coulleages weighing in on things. We knew her numbers where bad but the biopsy confirmed the copper storage disease.As much as this little girl has been thru in the 5 yrs we have owned her(she was a stray) she has a terrific disposition.we r just trying to.make her happy with no trama or pain, She is going to be estimated 10 in aug.Sorry if I writing to much,I just want to give u some background.Shes a terrific little personality and we have gotten to witness her come out if her shell over theses years. Learning to.play ,We lost a dog at 4 yrs old and it was a bad situation on a dog food switch,we don’t want to watch Lucy suffer the same fate so we r trying all we can. Thanks for any thoughts. ????

        • janie
          Reply

          Hi Jenn:

          I sent you a private email today.

          Janie

    • janie
      Reply

      Hi Jennifer:

      Let me try to gather some ideas and I’ll get back to you on Tuesday.

      Janie

  • Patricia Stephens
    Reply

    My girl is 14 years old,she is a miniature pincher. She just started feeling bad 2 weeks ago. The vet thought because she had several infected teeth that could b her problem. She took 2 weeks of antibiotics and went in today for an oral cleaning and to pull any bad teeth. He did blood work first and urine tests. He called b 4 doing surgery (which my heart hit the floor when I saw the vets # calling) to let me know she had elevated liver enzymes & He saw a little blood in urine. He wasn’t sure if the bad infected teeth were causing the problem or if she had liver disease, or possibly liver failure. He did oral surgery & everything went well. She seemed 2 feel better since she has been home. He sent medice home for her 2 take daily called Denamarin. He wants her to take it for a month then in 1 month check her levels again. She has been eating, drinking and going out to do her business just fine. She won’t jump up on bed or furniture or walk down the steps (only 3 of them) to go out to pee. I always pick her up, and sometimes she will whimper when I move her or pick her up. I can tell she is hurting and it’s been killing me. My kids r all grown and moved out so she is my baby (which we rescued). I asked him what her liver levels were, believe me said 700. Not sure what is safe #. I really don’t know what to do, I am already in process of changed diet. I no she is old but I’m just not ready to let her go yet. Any suggestions, advice, or just some education on what’s going on and what to expect. Sorry it’s so long, thank u.

    • janie
      Reply

      Hi Patricia:

      I’m sorry to hear about your old girl. I definitely recommend that you start feeding her a home cooked meal or something similar. You said you are in the process of changing her diet. What are changing her diet to and what supplements are you including?

      Do you need help in this area. I’m not sure if you’re already aware of this or not, but my cookbook offers a section for cooking for dogs with liver disease. The recipes are simplified with 3-5 ingredients and meant for the crockpot. It also includes the best herbs and supplements for her liver disease and how to get the enzymes down.

      You can check out the book here.

      I hope this helps.

      Janie

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