Having a Doberman Pinscher who had an arrhythmia, I felt it would be a good idea to investigate the issue of CPR for dogs.

My Own Experience

My own experience with bringing a dog back using CPR. Years ago I witnessed a friend give (who was a registered nurse) give her dog CPR.

Her dog was young at the time and got a little frisky with the lamp cord. Buster didn’t have a pulse and his owner started cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Within a few minutes, Buster was fine again.

Breeds Topping The List for Cardio Problems

Dobermans and Boxers are at a very high risk of developing arrhythmia’s (abnormal heart beat) and dilated cardiomyopathy or DCM which causes sudden death as seen in the video below.

Dr. Wallner of boxerunderground.com explains that if the irregular (erratic) heartbeats happen on occasion or infrequently, dog owners probably won’t notice any symptoms of the disease. On the other hand, if the abnormal heartbeats continue one after another; this is when weakness, collapse and sudden death can occur.

Sugar the Boxer Collapses During Training Videos and Suddenly Really Needs CPR

Ron Pace, owner of Canyon CrestK9 had to suddenly use his own training of CPR for dogs during a regular training session when his boxer student “Sugar” suddenly collapsed.

As mentioned above, sudden death often happens with Dilated Cardio Myopathy as you’ll see in the video. This is why it’s important for every dog owner and especially those with dogs that are at high risk of developing this particular form of heart disease to learn cpr for dogs.

Watching the above video certainly gave me the push that I needed to learn it for my own dogs in the event that I should ever need it.  Many people are just as frightened to learn this life saving technique as they are of someone or something needing it.  I urge you to take the time to learn it.  You never know when someone or something around you will need it.

While there’s no guarantees with anything in life, knowing CPR is certainly an added buffer.  Just imagine if you were in a position to save a dog whose heart suddenly stopped.  Because you know what to do, you jump into action and save the dog.

Think to yourself how good you feel when your dog looked up at you and gave you a kiss.  Think how good you would feel when that dog owner looked at you with ear filled eyes and gave you a huge bear hug.

Learn for Yourself

Please take the time to learn how to perform CPR on your dog by watching this video where Sugar the Boxer collapsed during training and needed this life saving tool.

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  • Vicki Holt
    Reply

    Thanks for bringing this important subject to peoples’ attention. I’ll be doing a free teleseminar on April 21, 2011 on pet first aid. I’m a certified instructor of pet first aid and CPR and know from my own experience and that of my past students how important it is to educate ourselves on how to prevent and manage pet emergencies. This presentation is one of an excellent speaker series on traditional and alternative pet health care. To participate in this free seminar, you can register at http://theevolutionofanimalhealthcare.com.

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