arnica for dogs and how to use it

Arnica is well known among those of us who practice holistic and natural healing for ourselves and our pets.  It’s popularity mostly comes from it’s healing power for pain.

This amazing herb should be included in every dog owner’s first aid kit.  Our article will teach you how to safely apply Arnica for your own dog.

Therapeutic Use

In most applications, the whole flower is used. It comes in the form of a pellet, tablet, gel or cream.  Some things to keep in mind when administering Arnica or any homeopathic medicine; it’s not that same as administering a traditional medicine and it’s important to understand this.

Use Pure Arnica from Boiron Which Comes in Pellets, Cream or Gel

*NOTE: Instructions and dosage below…

USING ARNICA FOR DOGS

1. MORE IS NOT BETTER and upping the amounts of pellets beyond the typical dosage DOES NOT increase the dosage like it does with traditional drugs.

2. Dosage and dosage frequency is not determined by how much your dog weighs. It is determined by your dog’s symptoms, frequency of the symptoms and the category in which they fall (recent, seasonal, chronic).  Typically 3 pellets are considered a dose, but this really depends on the dog’s condition and what the problem is.  A dose can be anywhere between 1-5 pellets depending on the severity.

3. Example: Arthritis is known as a chronic condition, meaning it has made a home in your dog’s body.  The typical dosage for chronic conditions is one dose 3 times daily. Remember, one dose is generally considered up to 3 pellets.  While 6C is considered low potency; 30C is considered in the middle when it comes to potency and seems to work well for arthritis.

4. Another example: If your dog hurts his leg running, etc., this would fall into the the category of “recent” category.  3 doses of 30C every 4 hours for two days would be good in this case.  If it’s a stubborn injury, you can give 5 pellets every 4 hours for three days.

Dosage and Instructions

1. The gel and cream forms are applied topically to any areas of the body where the dog has experienced trauma.  Arnica has been used to treat everything from sore muscles to bruises and sprains. Arthritis symptoms have also been alleviated with topical application of arnica gels and creams.

2. ADMINISTERING TO YOUR DOG: The pellets do not have to be swallowed by the dog.  The trick is getting them into your dog’s mouth without touching them. The pellet dispenser lid twists and so that you can get the amount of pellets you need. Using the lid, drop the pellets into the mouth.  If possible, you want to try and get them around the mucous membranes and allow them to dissolve.  So, place below the front teeth on the gum line, or in the jowl pocket of the cheek.  They will dissolve but it takes awhile. Dr. Elliot also shares a great idea of crushing the pellets and placing the powder into your dog’s mouth. If that doesn’t work, try this: once you’ve crushed the pellets, place the crushed arnica pellets into one tablespoon of distilled water and stir. Now place one teaspoon directly into the dog’s mouth.  Save the other two teaspoons for later. Give your dog another teaspoon of the water every four hours until you see improvement.

3. ARNICA DOSAGE: DO NOT GIVE WITH FOOD. FEED ARNICA 15 MINUTES BEFORE OR AFTER FOOD. Dosage: 3 pellets equal one dose (Dr. Elliot recommends giving 2-3 pellets at a time,  which again are considered one dose).  Directions for applying arnica to sore muscles, joints and sprains: It’s important to remember that arnica creams are used for closed-tissue injuries only. The infusion of arnica gel or cream should be applied directly to the skin itself and not the fur of your dog. After moistening the skin with arnica tincture, gel or cream and wrap the area in gauze or cloth. Secure it so that it can’t be taken off. Repeat this up to four times daily. If the condition worsens after 2-3 days, see your dog’s holistic vet.

4.  Dr. Weil recommends mixing one tablespoon of arnica tincture with a pint of spring (or purified) water. Using gauze or a sanitary pad, dip it into the mixture and apply it to the bruised area or sore arthritic joint.

instructions on using arnica for dog pain

 Preventative Measures

As mentioned, arnica shouldn’t be applied to open wounds. This is because it works quickly to stimulate dilation and circulation of peripheral blood vessels, which can actually increase the blood flow of an open and bleeding wound. Applying arnica gels or creams to open wounds can also slow the natural coagulation process.

If arnica is used too long, redness and irritation can result and dogs may lick or chew where it was applied. Abrasions and lesions have also been reported, so discontinue use if you see any of these signs on your dog’s skin.

Internal applications of arnica can result in stomach irritation and digestive problems if used too long. Throat irritation and mouth ulcers can also result, especially when arnica is used at a higher dosage than recommended. Other possible side effects include vomiting, diarrhea and even organ failure.

NEVER use arnica creams or gels around the eyes or mouth areas.

Reasons to Use

The best use of arnica is in its topical form to help alleviate sore muscles and bruising. It also has dramatic and demonstrable effects in the time period immediately after injury occurs, helping to cut down on symptoms of pain and strain in dogs.

As with all of the herbal treatments we’ve been discussing, you should monitor your dog’s reactions to arnica in any of its forms.  When using arnica for dogs, don’t overuse it and always follow any written instructions to ensure your best friend’s safety and well-being.

The History Behind the Herb Called Arnica

Arnica is actually a sunflower with bright yellow flowers and opposing leaves on the stem. Most arnicas have a satisfying aroma, existing as they do in the mountainous regions of North America.

The plant is a perennial that blooms in the second year of growth and is among the first flowers to bloom in early spring. Arnica is also known as Leopard’s Bane.

Arnica is usually used for dogs with muscle aches, strains and other associated injuries. It has also been used on dogs with emotional stress and can even aid in the rehabilitation process after dogs have experienced brain or spinal cord injuries.

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Showing 166 comments
  • Debbie
    Reply

    I own a Rottweiler who is 13 years old. Recently she has been shaking her head and developed a hematoma in her right ear. I had her to the vet and said she had an ear infection which he cleaned and she is now wearing an e collar so she won’t hit her head against a hard substance even though she is still shaking her head but less frequently. I came across your website and see that Arnica may be recommended to use. I found it in a health store in a cream, gel and I believe in a tablet but not in pellet form. Would it be okay to use both the gel and pills at the same time or one or the other would be best to start with? If I were to use the pills would it be okay to put it in her food whole or mashed? Thanks

    • yourolddog
      Reply

      Hi Debbie:

      The product I always recommend to my readers with regards to an ear infection is to use Zymox. A hematoma will heal naturally if you stop the dog from shaking the head. The hematoma will wrinkle up and the ear will look a little deformed, but it will heal. However, you have to heal the ear infection in order to heal the hematoma and Zymox can help with that.

      Arnica is more for pain. You can certainly use Arnica to help her with pain. I would use the pellets and the Zymox. Arnica and all homeopathic pellets are very, very tiny Debbie and you’re supposed to use the lid of the container to place the amount you need inside the lid (turn the container upside down and rotate the lid so that the pellets empty into the lid) and then place them in your dog’s mouth without touching them.

      It’s easiest to empty the lid into your dog’s jowl where it’s deep. The jowl is on either side of your dog’s lips. Just take your index finger and place it at the far end of either side of your dog’s lip and open.

      I hope this makes sense.

      Janie

  • Debbie
    Reply

    Thanks so much Janie for your advice. I just want her to stop shaking her head so the hematoma and infection can heal. I will certainly consider using Zymox instead of Arnica since she doesn’t seem to be in any pain. Appreciate your help.

    • yourolddog
      Reply

      Sure Debbie; my pleasure. Hope your girl heals well.

      Please let us know how it goes, so that others can benefit from your situation. 🙂

      Janie

  • Katie
    Reply

    Hi! My dog has horrible yeast issues and yesterday I came home to a swollen ear. When I searched hematoma, his looked much different. almost as if the ear was just enlarged, not as swollen as some of the images. It also wasn’t very red. We have been battling with constant yeast infections in his ear, on his paws, and all over his belly and hind legs; changing his diet, frequent anti-fungal shampoo with a vinegar rise, and daily coconut oil. Nothing seems to be working. I am looking to try the Arnica for his possible hematoma, since his ear seems to really be bothering him, as well as an e-collar to stop the constant scratching. Would this be beneficial?

    Thanks!

    • janie
      Reply

      Hi Katie:

      I’m sorry to hear about your dog. Actually the hematoma is probably the least of your problems.

      I have to ask. You said you changed his diet. What did you change it to and are you including any supplements?

      You can use the Arnica for pain and some sort of comfortable e-collar to stop him from scratching at the ear.

      Have you recently vaccinated him or used chemical flea and tick products on him? Let me know about the food, supplements and vaccinations and I’ll get back to you.

      Janie

      • Katie
        Reply

        Janie,

        I recently switched him to zingnatures and within the last month the rash on his belly is clearing a little more each day. He also receives a flora supplement along with a probiotic. We supplement with raw when we can but he is 75 lbs so that would break the bank for a full diet. He has not had any shots recently or chemical flea or tick treatments. We try and do everything all natural. We have been very lucky with fleas and have been flea free for over a year (he is just over a year old).

        The arnica, along with the comfy e-collar kept him from scratching his ear all day. The redness and swelling has actually decrease slightly. Hopefully more soon.

        • janie
          Reply

          Hi Katie:

          I’m glad to hear that the rash is clearing each day. I’m also glad to hear that you’re supplementing with flora and probiotics. Finally, I’m very glad you’re including raw. Rotate the raw meat every couple of days.

          If he is only a year old, I’m assuming he had a whole host of vaccinations most likely as an early pup in and around 3-6 month period, which wouldn’t have been that long ago Katie. This very likely could have been what caused the problem. Vaccinations wreak havoc on the dog’s immune system.

          The problem with yeast is becoming a larger and larger problem in dogs. Like many, I believe that vaccinations are just one of many things that are breaking down a dog’s natural defense. More and more dogs are fighting skin and yeast issues, just to name a few. Cancer in dogs is at alarming rates. The skin is the largest organ in the body, and for dogs, health problems tend to show themselves thru the skin first.

          I highly recommend that you build up his immune system with both a good multivitamin and Colostrum. Colostrum is one of the best things you can feed a dog with yeast or allergy issues. This is in addition to a good diet of course. Keep on including coconut oil in his food as well Katie.

          The hematoma will heal itself as I mentioned before. Your goal should of course be to eliminate the skin and yeast problems. Skin problems often include ear problems as well.

          If interested, you can purchase Nuvet multivitamin here on my site. It can only be purchased thru distributors and is one of the best vitamins you can buy. It’s also economical and you only need one a day. You can purchase Colostrum here on my site. It can also be purchased on Amazon, but it’s more expensive.

          I hope this helps. I would love an update on your boy down the road Katie.

          Janie

          In order for him to fight off the yeast and

  • Katie
    Reply

    Janie,

    Thank you so much for the advice! I will gI’ve him some time with the vitamins and colostrum you suggested and let you know!

    • janie
      Reply

      My pleasure Katie. I forgot to mention I think that if he gets chronic ear issues, I would keep Zymox on hand. It works very, very well for ear infections.

      Janie

  • Jackie Bryan
    Reply

    Hi Janie – I have an 11 year old golden retriever. He as hip dysplasis and some arthristic in his elbows. He also has a condition called Larpar (laryngeal paralysis). I do have a homeopathic kit that I’ve had for years (I hope it’s still good) I keep it stored in the bottom of kitchen cabinet. For his arthritis I recently started him on rymadyl full time, every 24 hours. In the past, I relied on laser treatment, water therapy and was also giving him adequan injections, but I didn’t see any improvements, and he had really difficulties getting up and when I take him for his walk (which I have had to shorten) his rear leg will buckle under him at times. I would prefer not to give him the rymadyl if I can learn how to give him the proper doage of homeopathic treatment. I also give him fish oil, and turmeric paste. Maybe, I didn’t give him the adequan long enough. It is very expensive. What would be your recommendation for him. For the first 3 years of his life, I fed him raw and then switched to a high quality dry kibble. He is currently on a home cooked diet with a small amount of dog kibble, Zerus. He weights approx. 94 lbs, down from 106 when I start cooking his food. Sorry for the long message. I will discuss the Larpar in another message. Thank you!

    • janie
      Reply

      Hi Jackie:

      Very sorry to hear about your old boy. He definitely has some issues.

      Are you using any chemicals on him such flea & tick products, heart meds, vaccinations? If so, when was the last time? At what age did the arthritis/hip issues start?

      I strongly recommend that you visit a Chiropractor that works on animals. Aligning the back can make a big big, big difference Jackie. I can’t recommend this enough to you. I also recommend acupuncture. I work with a chocolate lab who also has LP and arthritis issues like your old boy. While she didn’t go thru the chiropractic end, we had a acupuncturist come in weekly for four weeks. She takes a Chinese Herb called ER Chen Tang for LP (the acupuncture can help with LP as well). She also takes Resvantage for arthritis which has helped a great as well. All of this has helped her, but I still recommend a Chiropractor first!

      I would definitely dump the Rymadyl which will affect the liver, and eventually it will stop working or you’ll have to up the dose. You need to out line a good plan to include taking care of his immune health with a good multivitamin (we offer two different ones here at yourolddog) if you’re not already. Give a good toxin free fish oil daily. Provide calcium to your home made diet. I would also get rid of the kibble completely.

      Another thing you can look into is a good brace designed for arthritic dogs. I’ve used this one and although you’ll look at it and say, “how can this work”, it does. But again, I would align the back first.

      Hope this helps.

      Janie

  • Meghan R Vineyard
    Reply

    Hello!

    I have 10 month old bully puppy who weighs about 75lbs. She recently started limping on her back leg, about 3 weeks ago. Brought her to the vet who did x-rays which showed no bones damaged, but a little fluid around her knee joint. He seems to think it’s a ligament but obviously won’t know without mris. My mom has been using arnica for years and swears by it. I’m just wondering if arnica would be the way to go with Angel or if there is something else you would recommend? If so, what would be the dosage? I would really like to avoid having to bring her back and the doctor tell me I need surgery. I’m a firm believer in trying to heal homeopathicly. Thank you so much for your time!

    Meghan and Angel

    • janie
      Reply

      Hi Meghan:

      You can certainly try the Arnica for pain. But, I would try adding 1/4 teaspoon of pure sea salt to her water twice daily. If she won’t drink it then lower the amount of salt until you reach the amount that she’ll drink. Believe it or not, but salt and water have helped many a dog with arthritis.

      If it helps her and she appears healed, stop the salt in the water and just sprinkle a little sea salt on her food daily for good.

      Remember Meghan, watch the vaccines please……. AND, stay far away from chemical flea and tick products. Use natural. Feed your pup a good diet and I don’t mean all kibble. This will help her to age well.

      I would love to hear back from you Meghan…. 🙂

      Janie

      • Meghan R Vineyard
        Reply

        Janie,

        Thank you so much! I will have to try this out. That being said, she is only 10 months old, you think it might be arthritis? The doc seems to think maybe a torn ligament. Will the sea salt be the best way to go if that is the case?

        Thanks again!
        Meghan

        • janie
          Reply

          Hi Meghan:

          You’re welcome! I’ve read where it has helped. It could take a couple of weeks. Don’t allow the dog to run though. If that doesn’t work, then I would use Ligaplex II which should help. But again, you can’t allow her to run. Regardless, I would continue with the sea salt on her food.

          Will you let me know how it goes Meghan? Your response can help someone else… 🙂

          Janie

  • Meghan
    Reply

    I will try out the sea salt and will absolutely post progress! I’m not a fan of pharmaceutical drugs for myself, let alone for my fur baby. So anything narural that I can try to help her, I’m all in. Also, you stated something about her diet. Originally, we were giving her and her sister victors brand kibble, mixed with white rice and raw ground beef… we took them off the raw because I was reading a lot if controversial information on raw meat… we switched them from raw ground beef to cooked chicken (the breeder feeds their siblings raw chicken legs and that just scares me!) Angel is not only an American Bully (prone to allergies) but also a white bully (apparently even more prone to allergies) she had a few skin rashes, and also some mucusy stools. vet tried putting her on some heavy duty antibiotics. I spoke with a friend who recommended changing her diet and not giving her the meds… she mentioned that chicken may be the culprit…we switched them to Acana brand kibble that is a limited ingredient, no gluten, no wheat. Mainly lamb and apple… originally fed mixed with pumpkin (as recommended to help harden her stool) and eventually just the kibble with coconut oil… you stated that just kibble is not recommended. What dedo you suggest we add to their food?

    • janie
      Reply

      Hi Meghan:

      Ground meat, rice and kibble isn’t recommended for an ongoing diet. You’re concern for allergies is understandable, but, you also have to understand that dogs were designed to eat raw and most dogs that eat raw have less inflammation in the body. You can read my article here where I discuss a study done that talks about it. Remember, allergies are inflammation.

      If you’re feeding Acana (which is the dry food that I would recommend if I had to choose a dry food), then I would still include a little fresh food as well such as meat, egg and steamed green veggies.

      I hope this helps.

      Janie

  • Trish LeBlanc
    Reply

    I have an 11 year old dog with cancer, most of the lump was removed but not all and she is getting chemo, my energy healer recommended arnica pellets for her to help with the pain – what kind of dosage would she need?

    Trish

    • janie
      Reply

      Hi Trish:
      I’m so sorry for the delay in getting back to you. Holidays are taking up a great deal of my time. I’m also real sorry to hear about your old girl. Not sure what you’re doing for diet and other supplements, but this area IS critical.

      I like Arnica for bruising and injuries, but I think for something such as cancer, I would use turmeric and cannibis (talk with a holistic vet about cannibis) instead.

      Janie

  • Lynn
    Reply

    Thank you so much for the info on Arnica and dogs; I was inclined to do an internet search when my dog (9 y.o. female mix) started limping one day after jogging. I gave the 2 day, every 4 hour 3 dose of the tabs to her and she was doing great. Then a few days later she decided to do her fly around the basement in a circle routine to get out her energy and the next day was limping again and keeping her left front paw raised up. So, I started the two day regiment again and she is improved again but not totally there… how many days in a row can I safely give her the 3 doses every 4 hours? Thanks again!

    • janie
      Reply

      Hi Lynn:

      You’re welcome and I’m glad to hear that Arnica helped. The usual time period is for 2 days. However, you can use the 5 pellets 3 times day until you see improvement, then stop.

      Let us know how it goes Lynn. We’ll keep our paws crossed. 🙂

      Janie

  • Brenda Garza
    Reply

    Hello, I have a 7 yr. Old pitbull with an ear hematoma. He had ear infection which is being treated, so he isn’t scratching. My concern is that if I let the hemayona heal on its own, he will have a deform ear.I read deformec ear may interfiere with ear cleaning and that it looks horrible. ALSO HE WEIGHTS 102 POUNDS. What dog would you recommend? I give him rice, cook chicken, rice. Thank you

    • janie
      Reply

      Hi Brenda:

      I’m sorry to hear about your pittie. I’m not sure what you’re treating the ear with, but I recommend that you keep Zymox on hand at all times. It works very well.

      When dogs chronically scratch their ears and shake their heads, this is a sign that an infection is developing and/or a hematoma could be developing as well. These infections are very often associated with diet. Chicken and rice should only be fed for very short periods of time. For instance, if he gets sick and has diarrhea, then you would feed this only until his stool firms up.

      With a seven your old Pitbull, I recommend that you look into a raw diet which is the best thing you can do for him, his ears and any other allergies. When feeding raw, you will need to include calcium and a good multivitamin. The multivitamin should be given no matter what type of diet you’re feeding. I can’t stress enough to you that you should avoid kibble and canned commercial diets. Either home cook, feed raw, or feed a food like The Honest Kitchen where you simply add hot water (I still recommend adding some raw meat to the Honest Kitchen). This combined with the multi will do wonders for your dog.

      If interested, we offer both a tablet that tastes like a treat and a powder. Both of these are excellent and will help your dog with many issues. Daily Multi Powder with Calcium Daily Multi Tablet

      Also, regarding his hematoma, you need to keep him from shaking his head or mainly flapping his ear around. I recommend that you get an old sweatshirt, cut of the sleeve from the shoulder down. Now, cut the widest part of the sleeve that was closet to the shoulder. You want to be able to slip it over his head like an open sock and this will hold the ear in place even if he shakes his head. You may have to pin it to keep it tight enough.

      Let me know how it goes Brenda.

      Janie

  • Dianne
    Reply

    I have a 4 1/2 year old dog that frequently experiences muscle soreness in his front shoulder. When we adopted him we were told that he has a congenital
    ‘flaw’ in his shoulder. It was recently recommended to me that I give him Arnica on a daily basis to help alleviate the pain. I’ve been using 3 of the 30C pellets once a day. However after reading your page I’m wondering if I should be giving it more than just once a day. Any feedback will be greatly appreciated.

    • janie
      Reply

      Hi Dianne:

      You can give the recommended dosage as I state in the article, but once you notice your dog feeling better (up thru 3 days), then stop.

      You really might want to consider acupuncture as well Dianne. We’ve used it for several dogs and it works very well. Be consistent with it.

      I wish you and your youngster 🙂 the best.

      Janie

  • Sandra
    Reply

    can i give my german shepherd arnica and omega 3 complete?

    • janie
      Reply

      Yes Sandra….

      Janie

  • Ruth
    Reply

    Hi Janie
    A big feral tom attach my female 1 yr old Blue Russian cat last nite.
    Left a small gash wound( she allowed me to clean & apply a Aloe & golden seal paste.
    Her left paw also injured in this cat fight, which he would not allow me to touch to much, except to apply Dr.Kings homeopathy Arnica Montana ointment.
    However after a couple min, she started licking it off, and dashed out the door on 3 legs.
    I couldn’t get to stop my cat Lucky from escaping, that was 7am this morning, & hasnt returned home & it’s 1:30pm.
    Im worried that arnica ointment has made her ill, & unable to find her way home.

    Please advise.
    Thank you
    Ruth

    • janie
      Reply

      Hi Ruth:

      So sorry to hear about your kittie. I hope she has come home since you wrote your message earlier.

      I seriously doubt that her licking the Arnica has caused her any distress at all. I would venture to say it’s the wound itself. However, Arnica should never be applied to OPEN wounds as I mention in the article.

      I hope your girl has returned Ruth!

      Janie

  • Nancy
    Reply

    Hi Janie,
    I have a 12 y/o basset with arthritis which mainly affects his hind end. I have been taking him to a chiropractor and they recommended Arnica to help with inflammation associated with the arthritis. His lower spine and hips seem to be where the most discomfort. I have been giving him Arnica for a couple days now, how long can I safely continue to give him Arnica to keep his discomfort level down? I haven’t yet seen any improvement with mobility as far as him getting up and moving a little more smoother. Thanks
    Nancy

    • janie
      Reply

      Hi Nancy:

      As much as I like Arnica, I think it’s best used as a temporary herb for temporary problems. Arthritis is considered chronic (not temporary). If you use it for Arthritis, you’re best using it at one dose 3 x daily until the pain stops. Then stop the Arnica. Start it again when the pain returns.

      However, I would look to different alternatives if you haven’t seen improvement. I recommend that you add Celtic Sea Salt (NOT Hymalayin Rock Salt, or any other sea salt, or table salt). Give her 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon daily mixed in 1 quart of filtered water. If you add 1/2 tsp and he won’t drink it, reduce to 1/4 tsp. This salt has trace amounts of iodide and every living creature on the planet needs it and most, including dogs are missing this vital mineral. This ancient salt is loaded with minerals and can help tremendously with arthritic pain. The idea is to make sure he gets the 1/4-1/2 tsp daily with his water. So, if he slops up his water, you might want to just give him a little at a time, so that you’re not wasting it. If you start to see him improve, you can eliminate it from the water and just add to his food.

      Here is a link to the brand I recommend and use: Selena.

      Hope this helps. Won’t you come back and let me know Nancy?

      Thanks.

      Janie

  • Alma
    Reply

    Hi Janie,
    My almost 1yold Doberman/Lab mix hurt his front leg while rough housing with other dogs and was limping. So I put him on 24/7 crate rest and I got the arnicare gel from target and read that I was supposed to apply it twice a day for 3 days. I just finished my first day and while the limp is getting a lot better, he has been been vomiting and has diarrhea. I saw that these are side effects of arnicare. I really think the arnicare gel is working and I think ultimately he would benefit from my completing the 3 day regime, so how can I help him cope with the side effects?

    • janie
      Reply

      Hi Alma:

      I’m sorry for not getting back to you sooner. I hope your Dobe mix (I love Dobes) is doing better. I would definitely back off from using it too much and see if helps. I recommend backing it down to once daily and see if it helps.

      I don’t recommend looking for a way to help him cope with the side effects. Listen to his body.

      Janie

  • Michele
    Reply

    Do you have tricks for getting arnica pellets into dogs mouth?
    I have a 12 yr old sharpei/ chow mix. Has arthritis … But recent possible need is he broke a tooth and won’t be able to see vet til (Friday) … I’ll be calling them daily to try to get him in sooner. I’m concerned he’s in pain. He is eating (soft foods) but no longer will chew his bones (but wants to). Behaviorally he’s a lil needy. Just don’t want him in pain.
    I have placed the arnica pellets in a small piece of bread.. So at least it will get in him.

  • Georgia
    Reply

    Hi I appreciate your article & discussions on arnica for older dog.
    I have a 10 year old Yellow lab who limps from what I assume was a right shoulder injury, but don’t really know.
    Vet said exrays showed no arthritis, and suggested anti inflammatory and/or rest.
    Rest helps, but limp never went away 100%. Even though she loves to fetch and romp; I stopped throwing toys and now we walk but even minimal walks aggravate her shoulder but she seems more bothered that we don’t fetch and play than the activities in the moment.
    I read about putting pills in gums or crashing and giving in a teaspoon of water but I was wondering if putting Arnica in her water bowl was affective in any way?
    I think her mental health is suffering from lack of our fetching fun.
    I appreciate your time!
    Georgia

    • janie
      Reply

      Hi Georgia:

      I sent a message privately.

      Janie

  • chandlerschooler
    Reply

    my toy Australian just chewed up a bottle of these pills. Im not sure how many were left in the little blue bottle or how many she actually swallowed. Is she in danger?

  • Adriana
    Reply

    I have an 8-year old boxer who has been diagnosed with degenerative myelopathy. He has severe weakness in his hind legs. Any suggestions or recommendations for my baby? He doesn’t seem to be in any pain, .

    • janie
      Reply

      Hi Adriana:

      I’m sorry to hear that your boxer was diagnosed with DM. We actually offer a complete kit for dogs with Degenerative Myopathy. You can learn more about it here if you like.

      I’m glad to hear that he’s not in any pain though. I know it’s tough to watch. 🙁

      Janie

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