valerian root for dogs

You’ve probably heard of Valerian in use as an herbal sedative, which is exactly why we’re discussing it in this article, because Valerian is a natural and safe herbal option for dogs as well as humans.

It is renowned as a safe and gentle herbal treatment that does not alter the brain like alcohol or pharmaceutical sedatives do.

Valerian is a perennial flowering plant native to Europe and different parts of Asia, but it’s also been introduced to North America.

Sometimes called garden valerian, garden heliotrope and all-heal, the valerian we’re talking about today, is not the same as what you’re likely to find in gardens. That type is known as red valerian, but it is actually a different species.

Valerian blooms from May to July and is found in soils with a considerable degree of moisture retention. As mentioned, there are several native species in North America now – most are found in the western portions of the continent, but it has also shown up in New England.

 

Therapeutic Uses

The fall root  is the part of the herb that is used in forming treatment options. Sometimes the upper parts of the plant are used, but they provide a weaker form of medicine and do not have the more potent effects of the fall root.

  • Valerian is a top choice for herbalists when it comes to prescribing sedatives.It is used to calm anxiety in dogs and also can relax the body in cases of physical pain. Herbalists have prescribed valerian in cases where dogs have fears of thunderstorms, for instance, because its calming effects help mitigate the anxiety. As you might imagine, a little valerian can also help calm down shaky dogs on trips to the vet or other unsavory places. Schnauzerama.org shares dosage recommendations here for calming your dog on road trips or simple trips to the vet.
  • It is sometimes used to help reduce the severity and frequency of seizures in epileptic animals.
  • If you are using valerian as a sedative, it is most effective in small doses over the course of several days. You should use doses several times a day, especially in anticipation of a high anxiety event like the aforementioned trip to the vet. Dogs should be treated with five drops of tincture three or four times a day starting about three days prior to the anxiety event.
  • Can be used as a treatment for upset stomachs and spastic colons. In these instances, you should use a smaller dosage (0.25 to 0.5 milliliters of tincture for every 30 pounds of dog with a frequency of two to three times a day). A larger dose may lead to vomiting.

valerian

Click here to purchase Organic Valerian Root Powder

Preventative Measures

As mentioned, you need to be careful with the dosage when using valerian as a treatment for upset stomachs. Because of its soap-like consistency, it may cause some adverse reactions in dogs. This is not always the case, but there are reasons to be cautious.

Also, it does have the opposite effect in some dogs (and humans) when it’s used as a calming agent and a sedative. Some dogs (and humans) actually experience valerian as a stimulant.

*Keep in mind that you should not suddenly stop valerian; instead you should slowly wean your dog off the herb.

Reasons to Use

It is important to remember that valerian is as safe a sedative as you’re going to get for your dog. It is available through most herbal retailers and you can also purchase the plants in many nurseries. For dogs with anxiety issues or to mitigate the effects of high anxiety events, it’s definitely a nice option to have in your medicine cabinet.

References: Herbs for Pets by M.L. Wulff-Tilford and G.L. Tilford, Natural Remedies for Dogs and Cats by CJ Puotinen

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Showing 11 comments
  • Charlotte
    Reply

    I am using Valerian oil as a calming spray for a friends dog who is fearful of storms. Can you also give the oils to them orally and if so…how would you give it to them? I have another friend who will use the same calming spray to calm a dog who has separation anxiety…so I am curious if this would help him as well?

    • janie knetzer
      Reply

      Hi Charlotte:

      You have to be very careful with essential oils. I recommend that you give 5 drops of the tincture 3-4 times daily over several days.

      Janie

  • Ana
    Reply

    I have Valerian Root and cannot find a recipe for using it with dogs. Do you have any recomendations?

    • yourolddog
      Reply

      Do you have in tincture or dried herb form? Are you looking for dosage Ana?

      Janie

  • Maryann
    Reply

    I have dried bvalerian root and would like to use to make ” doggie” cookies. How much valerian (ground) and how much peanut butter, honey and oats?

    • yourolddog
      Reply

      Maryann, you need to search out a recipe. I have no idea.

      Janie

      • Laura
        Reply

        Did you find a recipe?

  • Laura
    Reply

    I will be moving in a month and want to keep my high-anxiety dog as calm as possible during the process without putting him on prescription medication. I have never made a tincture and would need to get started on that now in order to be ready for the move. Is the dried herb in capsule form noticeably less effective? Can you keep giving to dog as long as necessary? And would the dosage still be 5 drops several times a day for a dog weighing 20-25 lbs? Thanks!

    • yourolddog
      Reply

      You can try the capsule form; I just prefer tincture because they’re usually stronger.

      If using powder form, the dosage is 4mg per pound. If using tincture, I would give a 1/4 or a little more of the human dose. You can purchase a tincture here. If you use the tincture, just administer the drops inside your dog’s lip or jowl.

      You should only use this when needed. It should be be for those certain times. Don’t use it daily forever. I don’t know what you mean by “Did I find a recipe.”

      Janie

      • Laura
        Reply

        Hi thanks for your reply! I meant to comment that on another commenter’s post asking about a recipe for valerian cookies.

        • yourolddog
          Reply

          You’re welcome Laura. Now the recipe question makes sense…. 🙂

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