using honey for dogsMany pet owners probably aren’t aware of how honey has helped dogs with all sorts of issues including allergies, infections, kennel cough, digestion, wounds including burns, hot spots and pressure sores.

A few things that make honey so special is that it is naturally high in enzymes, high in antioxidants and flavonoids, and it kills anti-resistant bacteria including MRSA.

Here you’ll find the best type of honey to use, based upon your dog’s specific problem. It also gives clear directions on how to use it for your old friend.

THE QUALITY OF THE HONEY MATTERS: Tests show that most supermarket grade “A” processed honey is diluted with cheap products such as high fructose corn syrup, been heated and quickly cooled giving it a smoother look inside the bottle.  What this means is, it is useless as far any benefits go.  In order for your dog to receive any benefits from honey, it MUST be either local, fresh honey or Manuka.

*Avoid feeding diabetic dogs and dogs with cancer honey without first discussing with your holistic veterinarian.

1. Using Honey for Your Dog’s Allergies

Like us, many dogs too suffer from environmental allergies. Spring, summer and fall can trigger these sensitivities in dogs with symptoms such as rubbing the face, licking feet and thighs and scratching.

However, it’s important to make sure that you’re not confusing what you think are environmental allergies and your dog’s real problem is a food allergy (or both).  To learn more about food allergies, click here.

Follow the guidelines below for using honey for a dog with allergies:

  • What type of honey to use: Make sure your purchase local raw, unfiltered honey, or better yet, purchase local raw wild flower honey.  The wild flower honey will give your dog the best results because it covers so many different plants and flowers. This can often be purchased from bee farms.  Avoid Manuka honey when using for allergies since you need a local, raw honey.
  • Directions: 1 Tablespoon of raw wildflower local honey twice daily for large dogs such as labs. Use this as a guide and adjust according to the size of your dog. You must do this daily or the allergy symptoms will reappear.

2. Using Honey as A Wound Dressing for Burns, Infections, Hot Spots & Pressure Sores for Dogs

  • What type of honey to use: The best honey to use for burns, infections and pressure sores is pure Manuka Honey.  Clinical trials show that applying honey as a wound dressing eliminates bacterial infections, reduces inflammation, swelling and pain, and increases the growth of new skin.  It seals and keeps the area moist (including skin grafts) while protecting from sticking to bandages.
  • Directions for burns:  Trim the hair around the burn.  You’ll want to wash the burned area with vinegar and apply a thick coat of honey every 10 minutes until the pain decreases. Apply a LIGHT bandage over the area. Don’t allow your dog to lick or bother the area. A Elizabethan collar might be necessary for awhile.
  • Directions for pressure sores: Trim the hair around the area.  Gently blot to clean the wound. You can apply the honey directly by very gently placing a little honey over the wound with a clean spatula. Cover with a non-stick pad and wrap with gauze (not too tight).  You can also apply the honey directly to the non-stick pad and then wrap with gauze to keep in place.
  • Directions for hot spots: You MUST trim or shave the hair surrounding the hot spot until you can see healthy skin .  If not, all the bacteria, pus and infection become trapped within the hair.  It’s also critical that you clean the area before applying the honey.  You can use Povidone Iodine that most pharmacy’s or even supermarkets carry.  Dilute a little of the Povidone Iodine with water to an ice tea color.  Then use soft gauze to gently blot and clean the hot spot. Do this a minimum of twice daily. Apply a light layer of Manuka honey to your dog’s hot spot. Do the process of cleaning and applying the Manuka honey a minimum of twice daily.  If the hot spot grows instead of getting smaller, seek veterinary care immediately.

Precaution: When using honey as a wound dressing, it’s very important to use Manuka Honey  in liquid form, which means it should be soft and pour easily. Do not use crystallized honey on a burn or open wound! The crystals are sharp and can cause even more pain to your dog’s open wound.

How to soften crystallized or hard honey: Place the jar in a pot of very hot water (don’t microwave) until it can easily be poured.  Cool before placing on your pet.

3. Honey for Kennel Cough

  • What type of honey to use: Manuka honey is needed for dogs with symptoms of Kennel Cough.
  • Directions: Feed 1/2 up to 1 teaspoon depending on your dog’s weight.  Administer 4 times daily.

4. Honey for Your Dog’s Digestion

  • What type of honey to use: Again, Manuka honey works best for digestive issues.
  • Directions: Large dogs 1 tablespoon a day, medium dogs 2 teaspoons a day, small dogs 1 teaspoon a day.

5. Honey May Boost Your Old Dog’s Energy Level

Honey is a natural source of carbohydrates which increases energy.

  • What type of honey to use: You can use either Manuka or a local honey when it comes to boosting energy.
  • Directions: Large dogs 1 tablespoon a day, medium dogs 2 teaspoons a day, small dogs 1 teaspoon a day.

As you can see, honey offers some amazing benefits for dogs.  If you need to search out raw local honey for your dog’s allergies, this page may help.

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  • Ellen
    Reply

    Why can’t you give it to a dog with cancer?

    • janie knetzer
      Reply

      Hi Ellen:

      Cancer feeds on sugar and even though you may think of it as a natural sweetener, it still feeds cancer cells. Are you looking for something in particular?

      Janie

      • Ellen
        Reply

        Just wondering. I was reading through the post.. I have a itchy blacklab beagle. She’s 8 years old. We have try the the food thing… I am convinced its the environment. My father cured his allergies with honey. So why not my doggy!

        • janie knetzer
          Reply

          If your has cancer, honey is not recommended. If she doesn’t have cancer and just has allergies, then yes, honey may help, but it has to be local honey. Does she have cancer Ellen?

          • Ellen

            Nope. Sorry… My golden has cancer…..I have 3 doggies. The beagle lab is the itchy dog.

          • janie knetzer

            I realize you tried the food thing, you said, but what are you feeding? Is the dog itchy all year or just seasonally? What are you doing for the dog with cancer?

          • Ellen

            He’s between the ages of 10-12. We found him 4 years ago. The cancer is all over him. Keeping him comfortable. He is on a pain med.

          • janie knetzer

            Awe, that’s very sad. I’m sorry. Did the vet give him prognosis?

  • Ellen
    Reply

    He wound having Lyme. Took X-rays as well to make sure nothing else was going on and found little dots all over his lungs…..and his lynphnodes where a little big. ?

  • Baba Nuki
    Reply

    Can I give a dog a bit of honey AFTER the cancer ( anal cancer ) was removed ) ?

    • yourolddog
      Reply

      Hi Baba:

      If any, I would give Manuka and give it very limited amounts. Maybe a quarter of what you would normally give.

      Janie

  • Dottie sfreddo
    Reply

    My dog has allergies and chronic bronchitis and a small tracheal collapse he coughs a lot he is on cough syrup doxycycline prednisolone can I use money for hisc cough because nothing is working….he is 14.

    • yourolddog
      Reply

      Hi Dottie:

      I would try the old stand by of honey, lemon and warm water shared by Dr. Anderson. This works well for dogs with a tracheal collapse. However, if allergies are the problem, then you should use local honey made from bees in your area.

      For the cough syrup, add 1 tablespoon of honey, 1 teaspoon of lemon concentrate or fresh lemon and 1/2 cup of warm water. Mix it up good until the honey is dissolved. I don’t know what size he is, but you can you use your judgment with the cough syrup. You can give it as needed. I would also look into this natural tonic Dottie.

      You should remove any collars for dogs who have collapsed tracheas. Use a harness instead.

      Janie

  • Laurie
    Reply

    http://healthimpactnews.com/2014/honey-a-powerful-anti-cancer-agent/
    Raw honey is not as bad as you think for cancer.

  • Sharon
    Reply

    What if my dog has environmental allergies and digestive issues, allergic to protein.
    And my other dog had congestive heart failure and pulmonary hypertension and coughs constantly, he takes cough meds

  • Francie Colby
    Reply

    What age do you start with raw honey? My boy Fuji is 11 months old and got his ichiys from diet change when we boarded him!

    • yourolddog
      Reply

      Hi Francie:

      I’m sorry for the delay in getting back to you. Usually when the dog starts to wean (when the pup starts to eat other foods vs just it’s mother’s milk) is considered a safe time to start feeding honey Francie.

      However, you MUST use LOCAL HONEY and not store bought junk honey.

      Hope this helps.

      Janie

  • frank
    Reply

    Can this help treat MRSP in dogs. Rocco is 11.5 years old and has been fighting this for 3 months. He has circular lesions in different areas of his body. Topically would be a challenge bc they are in a bunch of diff spots. it should help internally?

    • yourolddog
      Reply

      Hi Frank:

      I’m so sorry to hear about Rocco. I can’t say for sure that honey would do it alone. I can tell you what I would do though. I don’t know what you’re feeding, but if it’s some dry food, I would dump it and start on a home made diet that includes plenty of meat, eggs and roughly 1/4% of the diet in soft leafy green vegetables and herbs such as parsley, cilantro. I would also include shitake mushroom.

      I would include a good fish oil and not a cheap one, Colostrum and a GOOD WHOLEFOOD multivitamin. I would include a good local honey as well — it can’t hurt! I would also include a little garlic daily for one week and then one week off and so on, (despite what you read, you can safely use this powerful natural antibiotic). There article will give you the correct dosage.

      I would completely stop using chemical flea and tick products if you’re using them. I would avoid all vaccinations as well!

      You have to build the immune system from the inside out…. I would flood his body and bombard his immune system with good food and supplements and eliminate any poisons thru vaccinations and flea and tick treatments.

      I hope this helps Frank.

      Janie

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