using turmeric for dogs imageWhile regular use of turmeric for dogs may seem a little unusual; the benefits of adding this wonder herb to your best friend’s diet, are very high.

There are a number of natural herbs, plants and spices that are often considered outside the realm of what’s consider “normal” for pets,  but offer just as many benefits that work just as well for dogs as they do for people.

This article shares those benefits.  For instance, dogs who suffer with joint inflammation or memory issues may benefit when turmeric aka  Indian saffron is regularly added to the diet.

USE ONLY PURE TURMERIC POWDER LIKE THIS ONE FROM BULK SUPPLEMENTS

*Note: Be sure to add 1/8 tsp. fresh pepper to one teaspoon of turmeric…

turmeric powder for dogs

How Can Turmeric Help Your Dog?

using the herb turmeric for dogsThere are a number of recorded benefits of how this herb can help your dog,

  • Pain: because all dogs are subject to arthritis, turmeric can play an important role due to its anti-inflammatory properties. It tops the list for natural remedies for treating dogs with stiff joints.
  • Blood Clots: Curcumin is also a blood thinner, which makes it an essential component when it comes to reducing the risk of blood clots and ridding the body of excess cholesterol. Although cholesterol doesn’t effect dogs like it does people, clots can lead to a number of problems for dogs, including heart issues.
  • Irritable Bowel Disease: Curcumin also stimulates bile production in the liver, which aids in digesting food properly because it helps break down dietary fats. Active dogs require diets that have at least 20 percent fat, so a little turmeric can go a long way with respect to aiding in overall digestion. Dogs that are pregnant, nursing or underweight require more fat in the diet, which means that more turmeric could help.
  • Cancer: There are some reports emerging, albeit somewhat tentatively, that turmeric could play a role in fighting cancer. Animal and test tube studies have revealed the herb’s capability to play a role in preventative medicine as an antioxidant. It has also been proven to shut down the blood vessels that feed cancer cells in some cases, although more research is certainly needed on the subject.
  • Dementia: In India where turmeric is used regularly among many; the number of people suffering from dementia and similar memory related diseases is considered very low.  Learn more about one of our favorite formula’s for doggy dementia here.

Turmeric Paste Recipe that lasts 2 weeks in the fridge…

What’s the Dosage Amount?

Dosage is roughly one eighth to one quarter teaspoon per 10 pounds of your dog’s body weight. Start slow and work up.

Things to Watch Out For

As with almost anything, there are some downsides to using turmeric.

  • It’s a binding agent, for one thing, which means that it can lead to constipation in some dogs. Because of this possibility, dogs should use plenty of water along with turmeric. Yogurt can also be administered to balance out the digestive flora.
  • Dogs that are prone to kidney stones should not be given turmeric since it increases urinary oxalate levels.
  • Also, some dogs are sensitive to turmeric and develop stomach upset.  If this happens, it’s possible that you’re giving too much or that your dog is simply sensitive to the  herb when added directly to their food.
  • Studies in people conclude that turmeric can have a negative effect if taking drugs for acid indigestion such as Tagamet, etc. See this article by the University of Maryland Medical Center.  So, I’d recommend avoid feeding turmeric and acid reducers at the same time (hopefully you’re not feeding acid reducers regularly anyway).
  • They also indicate that it can have an effect on those taking prescription drugs for diabetes or if taking aspirin.  So, same applies here; I would avoid giving turmeric and diabetic drugs together, and if you’re giving your dog aspirin, I also wouldn’t give the two together.  Give one or the other.

Overall, however, most case studies have revealed many positive effects with dogs taking turmeric. Nonetheless, better safe than sorry.

*Tips: One person wrote in to share that her dog is on Trilostane to treat Cushings Disease.  She wanted to let me know that her vet told her that Turmeric can be fed when a dog is taking Trilostane.

For even more information, join the Turmeric User Group on Facebook.

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Showing 208 comments
  • Ann
    Reply

    My dog Sammy is currently taking prednisone for a skin issue we’ve been dealing with since August. The prednisone is not doing anything to help and we are in the weaning off process. I have been referred to taking him to a dermatology specialist. I would like to start him on the tumeric past but want to make sure I can give it to him while he’s on the prednisone. Is it safe to give him both?

    • yourolddog
      Reply

      As far as I know it’s safe Ann. See the article section where it says “Things to Watch Out For.”

      • Margaret
        Reply

        Have you considered having your dog tested for perhaps food allergies ? More than likely it is food allergies. ?

  • Christopher neilly
    Reply

    Hi my dog has a skin allergy and steroids and antibiotics from my vet dont seem to be clearing it up whatsoever iv spoke to some people about this issue and been told i should use tumeric on him. Hes 11 month old english bulldog and would appreciate if someone could give me some advice on wether i should start giving him tumeric & how much he should be getting

    • yourolddog
      Reply

      Hi Christopher:

      It’s not going to hurt to try and you can follow the recipe on my page here for the golden paste which includes dosage.

      If it doesn’t work, then I recommend you definitely look at diet and including a good multivitamin along with a good fatty acid.

      Quite honestly, you should be giving both of the above anyway along with a wholesome diet that includes excellent forms of protein, plus green veggies, etc. You might want to look into raw Chris.

      Janie

  • Sally
    Reply

    I have used Tumeric root ground up in a morning ‘green’ drink and eliminated my pain from hip bursitis. I want to try it on my elderly arthritis dog. How much shaved or ground root should I add to her food. She weighs 35 lbs. I think your recipe is using Tumeric spice powder which could be a different concentration from the root..

    • yourolddog
      Reply

      Sorry Sally, I don’t have a recipe using fresh turmeric. You really should consider either the paste recipe I share, or capsules that includes Biopirine, so that the turmeric can easily be absorbed into the bloodstream.

      Janie

  • Marie O'Mara
    Reply

    Our chocolate lab 9 years old was diagnosed with a tumour in the pleural cavity in early December, I’ve been giving him originally turmeric capsules opened up and put on food but now made up golden paste and just increased after 3 weeks to 1tsp per day. He is now on 4 x 5mg prednisolone in the am along with pardale v and omeprazole and an antihistamine in the morning and the same bar the pred in the evening before bed, I am giving the turmeric in the afternoon to avoid giving it at the same time as the other tabs. He was given 2 months in December and other than a couple of instances where he was poorly he has been doing ok, breathing is better but he grunts when he gets up and down this is the only sign of some discomfort. He is eating well and drinking ok and usually seems happy in himself bright eyed and waggy tailed!

    My question is can the turmeric help with pain if I stop the pardale, he is now down to 2 a day from three and has been on these initially 3 a day since initial diagnosis in early December, the hospital initially diagnosed thymoma, then mast cell then lymphoma but they cant seem to actually tell us for sure what it is, just wanted him on chemo drugs which we didn’t want to give him especially as they say they cant tell if its malignant or not unless we put him through more tests with little hope that they will make a difference. If not help with pain as long as I give turmeric at a different time from the nsaids is this ok, I really don’t want to cause him more problems but would also like to keep him with us for as long as he is happy, eating and walking every day. Any advice would be very welcome, the vet knows we are giving him turmeric and he is also on a high protein diet, his weight dropped to 34kg but he is now back up to 39kg thank you

    • yourolddog
      Reply

      Hi Marie:

      I’m very sorry to hear about your lab. My own girl had (has) a tumor that was diagnosed as a Fibrosarcoma back in August of 2015. The vet offered to place her on something for $250 a month, or take her to a surgeon who would cut off her leg. I said “no thanks.”. Maggie’s tumor has shrunk tremendously through the use of herbs, diet and exercise. She is full of energy and looks wonderful.

      There are a few things that I would recommend for him. What kind of diet is he eating and are you giving any supplements? Would you consider home cooking or raw? Let me know. You are not vaccinating him or using chemical flea and tick products on him, I hope….?

      Janie

  • Iva
    Reply

    do you have to give the dog the dose with its food daily, weekly or monthly?

    • yourolddog
      Reply

      Hi Iva:

      Daily.

      Janie

  • Marie O'Mara
    Reply

    Hi Janie,we did put him on raw diet but he came down with really bad bloody dia and stopped eating, 2 vets visits later he started to settle after probiotics and antibiotics and he has been ok since, we were advised to stop the raw diet as the steroids make him more susceptible to infection etc. He is currently on kibble which has no grain is meat and veg (high protein), 2 tins of dog food (twice a day with the kibble) again high protein and once a day he has either fresh cooked chicken or lamb, or sardines or mackerel and fresh scrambled eggs, we’ve just upped him to turmeric GP 1/2 teaspoon twice a day dinner time and tea time to avoid tabs he is on. He is vaccinated (always has been its a condition of the insurance we have for him (not that that has done us any good was wiped out in the first hospital visit) I hadn’t heard that this was a potential problem until now, he had a booster around sept/oct last year. He is getting extra omega 3 through the sardines and mackerel and he is having the Golden paste made up from turmeric, coconut oil and black pepper, I am a member of the turmeric users group on facebook who have been very supportive, one of their members confirmed that the pardale is not a nsaid so I’m not too worried about him being on pardale now. I would home feed him but after him being ill a couple of weeks ago I’m scared to do anything in case I make him sick and he has settled down well with the diet detailed above, his poo is now better formed and his tummy settled. Any advise would be very gratefully received just really scared of making him ill, if he stops eating we are in real trouble as he looses strength and he then has difficulty fighting back, he is now back up to 39k which is heavier than I would normally like but rather than risk him being lighter we are now feeding him up, which needless to say he has no objections to! I would however say that we are feeding him more than we used to and seem to be maintaining his weight around 39k. We have been told that if this is cancer it will take the nutrients from him and he will loose weight, don’t know if weigh maintained is therefore a good sign, there is so much info out there on the web its really difficult to make the right decision took ages before I made up the GP I was scared to make him sick. Just want to keep him with us for as long as possible!

    • yourolddog
      Reply

      Hi Marie:

      You’re response makes perfect sense. This is why I like to use both raw and cooked, and I think every dog is different.

      I can share with you the supplements that I use for Maggie Marie. She takes Essiac Tea twice daily. If you don’t know much about it, you can learn more here (once there, scroll down to read more information) where you can also purchase the product if you want. I personally wouldn’t go without this for a dog battling cancer. The herbs included in Essiac are strong weapons against the disease and building a very strong immune system. Although the instructions say differently, I give Maggie the tea in the morning and I mix in 1/4-1/2 tsp dry Essiac at dinner. For your dog though, I would use more dry at dinner and I would follow the instructions for serious disease (3 x daily) vs maintenance.

      Maggie also takes Resvantage. Resveratrol (not from grapes) is believed to stop the progression of the disease. I use this this to keep Maggie’s tumor from growing any larger and I’m happy to say that her tumor has actually shrunk.

      I also give her Colostrum which also helps with the immune system, respiratory, allergies or any place that the body is weak and needs help. She also takes Nuvet as a multivitamin.

      For diet, I highly recommend that you include a lot more vegetables (all steamed very, very well (you can steam in the microwave) or raw and diced very, very small) such as broccoli, brussel sprouts, asparagus, green beans, cauliflower, parsley and chives. Mix them up and rotate daily. I would give her fresh home lightly cooked (baked) meat that you would eat, combined with egg and veggies at every meal. Dump the tins of dog food and the dry.

      The fact that he was vaccinated recently, really weakened his already vulnerable immune system. You need to build up his immunity with the right supplements and diet Marie.

      I’m so sorry that you’re going through this Marie. If he loses muscle tone, add whey to his home cooked meals to build muscle.

      Janie

      • Marie O'Mara
        Reply

        Hi Janie wouldn’t use the tea due to initial issue in tumour possibly getting bigger when we last x rayed it had shrunk slightly but was still almost filling the pleural cavity we simply couldn’t take the risk of him not breathing enough oxygen almost lost him in December will research others more fully other issue is we simply don’t know if this is a cancer that we are dealing with its been almost 3 months since initial hospital visit and most of the time he is doing ok just the odd issue now and again with stomach upsets we think probably due to the meds he us on. (Said very quietly in case fate listening!) Just wanted to say thanks for suggestions Marie

  • Kristen
    Reply

    I have a 75 lb, 2 year old Bernese Mtn Dog/Rough Collie mix who had surgery for an angular limb deformity when he was 1, and then another surgery about 9 months later to have the pin removed as it was causing him pain. The surgeon now suspects that he has (or is developing) elbow dysplasia. I cannot afford another surgery, and would like to heal him, or at least keep him comfortable. He is a playful, energetic dog and neither condition has slowed him down at all. I have him on a grain free food, along with fish oil and glucosamine (with chondroitin, MSM, and hyaluronic acid). I would like to add turmeric–or replace the expensive glucosamine with it. I have 500mg Turmeric Curcumin in capsule form. My questions are 1) can I use the capsules for the recipe above, or is fresh turmeric a different strength than the capsules? 2) Could I give him the turmeric directly in capsule form, or is 500mg too much? 3) Would you recommend adding turmeric to his current routine, or can I replace the glucosamine with it?

    • yourolddog
      Reply

      Hi Kristen:

      I’m really sorry for the delay. I’ve been swamped, both online and off. Sometimes life gets in the way. 🙂

      Anyway, you can certainly use the Capsule form that you have. However, you want to make sure that it does include the piperine so that it’s absorbed into the bloodstream. Without it, it just doesn’t work as well. You should give about 20mg per pound, so that would be 1500mg a day, or 3 500mg capsules.

      Regarding his elbow dysplasia; I would consider a brace for him. Orto Canis is a European Co., but it appears others here in the U.S. have successfully purchased from them. Here’s their link. I like the design of their brace. Here’s a link to an American company as well.

      Quite honestly, I would keep him on the glucosamine and add the turmeric as well Kristen.

      Hope this helps.

      Janie

  • Roxanne
    Reply

    My dog is on Tramadol. Diagnosed with invasive cancer but want to help him any way we can. Even if its short lived. Would it be fine to give him the Turmeric mixture. P.S. – All home cooked organic foods now. Let me know asap. Thanks!

    • yourolddog
      Reply

      Hi Roxanne:

      Sorry to hear about your dog. Feed high protein with a lot of veggies. I don’t think the turmeric will hurt at all. If you read my article, then you know that I share information on how it may help with cancer due to it’s high antioxidant content.

      If your dog has invasive cancer, I would certainly consider all three of these products: Essiac Tea which is amazing for helping the body fight the disease; I use it for my own dog. I would add Resvantage which contains resveratrol and is believed to stop the disease the disease from spreading. I also use this. Finally, I would add a strong antioxidant supplement that reaches the cells.

      All three of these products are excellent for the disease.

      Janie

  • Stephan
    Reply

    Hi, my vet says that my shepherd suffers from bacteria infection of the skin.

    Particularly around the chin, ears and paws.

    The vet says this will be a lifelong condition and gave me some shampoo and steroid cream which has some pretty powerful side effects.

    Instead I have been giving her baths with brown vinegar in the water to use as an anti-fungal-bacterial rinse. I use T-Gel as the shampoo.

    Because she was constantly chewing her feet, she has to wear an Elizabethan collar while at home. I clean her feet with water and a small drop of Vetasept Povidone-Iodine and then put a normal antifungal foot cream between the pads to stop the itching.

    My question is, if it is as the vet says a permanent bacterial infection that some dogs get (I seriously doubt this is true) will this turmeric treatment work its way through her body to her skin and help kill off this so called constant bacterial infection?

    Personally, I do not think the vet is right because just itching on the chin and feet strongly suggest that she has an intolerance to grass or something on the grass in the park which may be Oak pollen. I will have to stop taking her to the park for a while to see if it clears up.

    Either way, I don’t want her constantly gnawing at her feet and rubbing her chin, nor do I want her to have to wear the collar all the time she is at home.

    Do, you have any helpful suggestions that may solve this problem?

    • yourolddog
      Reply

      Hi Stephen:

      You are right that bacterial infections don’t have to be life long. The most important place to start is with the immune system. How old is your dog and was she recently vaccinated? What do you feed her?

      Janie

      • Stephan
        Reply

        Hi, yourolddog.
        Jaimie is 9 years old, she has a widely varied diet with no visible signs of effects. She is having a constant battle with a mite infection in her right ear. Which may be a cause of her foot problems. She is being treat with Advocate complete but that does not seem to be working to well with mites. As for her feet problem, I will solve the soreness problem first with the use of an Elizabethan collar, washing with the prescription shampoo and cream. Once they are healed, I will use Johnsons 4 Fleas shampoo to solve the Mite problem. It contains pyrithiamine which is derived from or based on a natural extract from the chrysanthemum plant that kills mites on contact. As for the bacteria, I think I will bath her once a week with the Johnsons 4 Fleas combined with a few tablespoons of vetasept Povidone-iodine to kill two possible problems at the same time. Well that is the plan, but of course I am open to advice as well.

        • yourolddog
          Reply

          Hi Stephan:

          Actually chronic ear problems are a sign of diet issues. If you’re feeding kibble, then there’s a very good chance Jaimie is indeed having issues relating to food. The problems with the feet and the ears indicate that she is having a problem most likely to food. If you’re using chemical flea and tick products, vaccinating her and feeding her kibble; I can almost guarantee you that she is having issues with both food and a weakened immune system.

          Waxy, thick, brown paste is often thought to be be mites, when indeed, it’s usually yeast. But regardless, I would go natural. Pyrithiamine might have been derived from the Chrysanthemum plant, but it is by no means all natural. I suggest feeding Jaimie more lightly cooked meat, fish (cooked all the way through and steamed cooked veggies. Then, include fatty acids in the form of fish or krill oil which she must have and this can help with inflammation of the ears. I would also include a good multi vitamin Stephan. Just like you, your older girl needs help with her immune system to stay strong.

          Unfortunately Stephan, you’re plan most likely won’t work and your girl will decline. Advocate Complete is loaded with poison and will only add to her problems in the long run. If you build up her immune system with food, herbs, a good fish oil and multivitamin and get rid of the chemicals you plan on dousing her with, she will most likely get better. If you don’t and you continue with the your plan, she will decline and decline and decline.

          You can’t expect to apply something topically when the problem is on the inside, and it is. I would change her food to a home made diet along with the supplements I suggested (if you need help on actual supplements, let me know and I will gladly help) along with avoiding Advocate Complete, Johnsons 4 Fleas and any other synthetic poisons. For the ears, this formula of Zymox will definitely help, but it has to be the Ear Treatment with Cortisone. It doesn’t look like Amazon UK sells it, they only sell the ear cleaner. If I were you, I would investigate further. But again, she has bigger problems than just the ears.

          Would you be willing to home cook for your girl Stephan?

          Janie

          • Stephan

            Hi Janie, She already has lots of cod liver oil, glucosamine and vitamin tablets with additional vitamin D tablets.

            She only has a problem with one ear, the other is beautifully clean and free from any form of infection. It started out as a mite problem that has got infected. Originally, it was full of coffee granules, abscesses and runny sores. I am have successfully cured all of these problems except a mild fungal problem. That is now under control and the discoloration is slowly fading. I have determined that the foot and chin problem is associated with her going on the grass in St James Park. It is either the grass itself or oak pollen/dust. I know she cannot pick up oak stick as it makes her lips sore. So, now she is not allowed on the grass. I am treating her with D-10 shampoo and cream which seems to be working at the moment. I combine the D-10 with a couple of tablespoons of vetasept Providone Iodine Surgical Scrub. As for the rogue bacteria in her body, I am confident that the turmeric past recommended in here will take care of that over time. As for home cooking specially for her, I am not convinced that her diet is wrong as all of her problems are in localised areas e.g. not both ears and not all of her paws are affected. I think I will increase her baths from once a month to once a week for a few months and include the iodine in the final rinse and see how she gets on.

          • yourolddog

            Hi Stephen:

            Sorry for not getting back sooner. Too many tasks and not enough hours….

            It sounds like you have a plan, and even more than that, you sound confident that it will help. That’s awesome. Keep me posted and let me know how it all goes okay. I too the the turmeric paste will help with underlying issues. If what you’re doing doesn’t work, then I suggest reconsidering what I said in an earlier message.

            We’ll keep our fingers crossed for your girl Steve.

            Janie

  • Stephan
    Reply

    Hi Jane, just another thought, When she comes indoors from a walk, I am treating her paws with the iodine scrub and then the D-10 cream in addition to making her wear an Elizabethan collar while she is in the house for the time being. It seems to be working and the soreness is now fading.
    regards Steve

  • Kathleen Timmins
    Reply

    I have my 5yr old pitbull on tsps of turmeric for arthritis. She’s been on this for over 6 mos and she was doing great. In the last two week she has started holding her leg up again. It works out after a bit. I started her back on the glucosomine again, but still no relief. Why would the turmeric stop working?

    • yourolddog
      Reply

      Hi Kathleen:

      I’m really sorry for the delay.

      I’m not sure why the turmeric would stop working other than her leg bothering her after exercise. My own dog has issues where she’ll hold up her hind leg once in awhile.

      You should definitely feed a good food, add fatty acids and give her a good multivitamin daily.

      Janie

      • Kathleen Timmins
        Reply

        I have her on a raw diet and she gets an omega 3 plus the glucosomine and spirulina along with the turmeric with each meal. She is fed twice a day. Her leg bothers her when she gets up and after walking for a bit she will walk on it. The vet had given us rymidal(sp)for pain when this first started. I don’t want to put her on it on a regular basis so I only used it for a little while. I have given her 1/2 a tab every once in a while to help her with the pain,but this is one of those meds that requires her to be checked if on it for long periods of time and I don’t want to have her on steroids either. So if there are any other suggestions, it would be greatly appreciated. I will look into a good mult vitamin for her. THanks for your suggestions.

        • yourolddog
          Reply

          Hi Kathleen:

          It could be that she has a torn ACL or CCL which would explain why turmeric stopped working. Turmeric can certainly help with pain, but it won’t heal torn ligaments which this could be.

          I typically recommend trying Ligaplex II along with a knee brace for the dog. You can start with the Ligaplex II and see how it goes; but I would use both. The brace supports the knee and it sounds like it could be her ACL or CCL.

          I’ve had readers who have had great success and readers with no success; so it just depends Kathleen. If you try it, I would love to know how she does though, please. 🙂 I hope she does well.

          Janie

    • Stephan Toth
      Reply

      The first thing to do is to take your dog to your vet for an ultrasound of the ligaments of the affected knee. If it is a torn ligament it may take an operation to mend it. If it is an inflamed ligament then the vet can inject some steroid solution into it. It may not be a ligament problem but arthritis in the knee. Keep up with the turmeric solution but add a teaspoon of apple cider vinegar to it. That will dissolve any salts that are building up between the knee joint and help it heal. Also, put your dog on high doses of Omega 3. Quail Oil is the best to use but it is a bit expensive. You can supplement one tablet of Quail Oil with one of Cod Liver Oil. Also keep up the glucosamine tables. Also, check your dogs weight, a few pounds can be the difference between a healthy dog that has full mobility and a sickly dog that has trouble getting up onto its feet. Your dog should have a well defined waist and only enough fat on its chest so that the ribs don’t show through the skin. I wouldn’t use a brace at this time because though they are good for serious conditions, they do weaken the muscles on the limb that they are on. I know this from personal experience when I had a torn ligament in my right hand. I had it in a brace for six months and when I took it off, my wrist hurt like hell for around two months until the strength came back. NO, instead encourage your dog to lay down on the opposite side to the injured limb and only take it for short walks just to mess and pee. You can do some physiotherapy by VERY GENTLY flexing the joint in all natural directions. Hold it in both of the flexed positions (in and out) for around 15 seconds. Do three repetitions of each movement with a couple of minutes in between them. ALSO, check your dogs pads on the affected foot. Check between his toes for any foreign objects or splinters. Check to see if they are red and sore from licking. If they are, put some Iodine in about a cup full of water, add that some Johnsons 4 Fleas dog shampoo (it contains pyrithiamine which kills mites) pour the solution in a bowl and rinse his paws in it. Dry them and then smear some D10 anti-bacterial anti-fungal ointment onto them. Here we are not talking about the pads, we are talking about the soft skin between his toes. Also, check the length of their claws, they should be about one sixteenth of an inch (or more) above the floor when standing. Over long claws cause pain in the cuticles (try it for yourself, tap your finger nails hard on the table for ten minutes to see). I say this because a lot of dogs limp when they have sore feet and that causes an alteration in their gait which can affect the geometry of their ankles, knees and or shoulders/hips, hence the wear on the associated joint. Sorry for the long post but this is a rather complicated issues that needs explaining well.

      • Kathleen Timmins
        Reply

        Thank you all for your suggestions. Since Shayla doesn’t limp all the time and after she moves a little she puts her leg down and walks on it, I do not believe it is a problem with her acl or her knee. I keep checking her foot, but can’t find anything. I do believe it is arthritis. I just don’t understand why the turmeric stopped working. I will get her on a multi vitamin. Thanks again

  • Pat Burroughs
    Reply

    Hi we just recently found out that our 14 1/2 Sheltie has cancer he is a steroid ,a dioratic and also gets a thyroid pill once a day he is on a antacid I was going to make the paste to give to my other dogs who range from the age of 9 – 1/1/2 as they are all still active in agility would I be able to give a little bit to my cancer dog ? He was on anti inflammatory ( Metacam) but can no longer have it .

    • yourolddog
      Reply

      Hi Pat:

      I’m sorry to hear about your old boy. This kind of news is heartbreaking.

      According to the University of Maryland, studies in people indicate that turmeric can have a negative effect on antacids. So, I wouldn’t give both together. Cancer loves acidic environments and this is why the right diet is critical. I don’t know what kind of cancer he has, but if you would like suggestions, let me know. Or, take a look at my cookbook which has some simple recipes for dogs with cancer and you make them in the crockpot.

      FYI, I use Resvantage to keep the cancer from spreading on my own dog Maggie. It helps to keep the disease local. Combined with a home made diet and a few supplements, her Fibrosarcoma has shrunk and is hardly noticeable. Resvantage also works very, very well for arthritis. My neighbor’s dog is on Resvantage for arthritis. She always had a very weak back end and her legs just didn’t support her well at all. It has helped her so much. I can’t say enough about it.

      It’s not cheap though. But neither is Metacam and other synthetic drugs. If you get it, I recommend that you purchase the auto ship so you can save $15 per order. I can offer you other suggestions with regards to diet and a few other supplements if you’re interested. Let me know.

      Janie

  • Kacie
    Reply

    Hello. My cocker spaniel is 6 and we just found out he has a mild form of arthritis in his spin and left hip. He also has mild hip displasha in his left hip. The vet gave him carprofen and teamadol. They are both expensive and we can not afford to keep him on them. Would just using turmeric be beneficial? Or what else can we do!?

    • yourolddog
      Reply

      Hi Kacie:

      While turmeric may help some dogs, I’ve seen better results when it’s combined with other ingredients that also help with arthritis. This product gets excellent reviews.

  • debbie
    Reply

    My dog is a 10 yr old mini daschund..vet said she had congestive heart failure a yr ago..she has been on vetmedin , enaparil and flueresomide..can she take the tumeric paste recipe?

    • yourolddog
      Reply

      As far as I know she can.

      Janie

  • Cherie
    Reply

    Hi, I have a dog with skin allergies, yeast problems. On home cooked diet, starting the GP. She is 12 lbs, 3 yrs old. How much GP, how often? She’s on omegas, probiotics, enzymes, raw goat milk. I’ve tried just about everything to clear the yeast overgrowth, darkened elephant skin on chest, groin and legs, itchy all the time. I give ACV but I see no difference. I was using turmeric sprinkled in her food but didn’t notice a difference so I’m switching to the paste, see if it improves. What multi-vitamin do you like and have experience with? My dog doesn’t receive any carbs like corn, wheat, rice, potato, no fruits. Only dark green vegetables. Steamed or blenched. What allergy testing is reliable? Some say blood, hair, saliva, scraping then I hear they are not reliable. Your suggestions would be appreciate. Thank you.

    • yourolddog
      Reply

      Hi Cherie:

      I’m so sorry to hear about your little girl. You’re doing all the right things with regards to food (as long as you’re feeding a nice variety meat and fish along with veggies). I would start with a 1/4 tsp. once a day for two days working up to 1/4 tsp twice daily.

      You can use a home testing kit for allergies. You simply include a little fur and a swab of saliva, and then return it in the envelope. You’ll get a very detailed report back.

      I first recommend trying Repair & Strengthen before investing in the kit Cherie.

      Hope this helps.

      Janie

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